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In a volatile market, it's easy to allow your emotions to influence your investment decisions. But if you can keep your cool while those around you are losing theirs, you may be able to take advantage of potential opportunities.

One way to do that is by reviewing your portfolio to determine if it's time to rebalance your asset allocation or modify your level of diversification.

Rebalancing means adjusting your portfolio to get it back to your original target allocation. In today's market, it often makes sense to first determine whether that original target is still appropriate for your needs. If it makes sense to return to your original allocation or establish a new one, there are two ways to proceed. You can sell securities in some asset classes and invest the proceeds in others, and/or redirect new investment dollars into selected asset classes until the target allocation is reached.

If your current allocation is appropriate, but there are concerns with your overall level of diversification, it's possible to shift some investments within a given asset class. Keep in mind that selling securities can have tax consequences, depending on account type.

Asset allocation and diversification can help manage investment risk and might better position your portfolio for the future. The silver lining to broad-based market turmoil is that you may be able to acquire some investments at a discount relative to what you would have paid when the market was up.

The return and principal value of stocks fluctuate with changes in market conditions. Shares, when sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost. Asset allocation and diversification are methods used to help manage investment risk; they do not guarantee a profit or protect against investment loss.

Although there is no assurance that working with a financial professional will improve investment results, a professional can evaluate your objectives and available resources and help you consider appropriate long-term financial strategies.

 

This material was prepared by Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of The Retirement Group or FSC Financial Corp. This information should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representatives nor Broker/Dealer gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If other expert assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information or call 800-900-5867.

The Retirement Group is not affiliated with nor endorsed by fidelity.com, netbenefits.fidelity.com, hewitt.com, resources.hewitt.com, access.att.com, ING Retirement, AT&T, Qwest, Chevron, Hughes, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, ExxonMobil, Glaxosmithkline, Merck, Pfizer, Verizon, Bank of America, Alcatel-Lucent or by your employer. We are an independent financial advisory group that specializes in transition planning and lump sum distribution. Please call our office at 800-900-5867 if you have additional questions or need help in the retirement planning process.

The Retirement Group is a Registered Investment Advisor not affiliated with FSC Securities and may be reached at www.theretirementgroup.com.

 

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Tags: Financial Planning, Lump Sum, Pension, Retirement Planning, Market Volatility