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With international stock markets comprising about 45.5 percent of the world’s capitalization, a broad range of investment opportunities exist outside the borders of the U.S.1

For investors who are looking to diversify their mutual fund portfolio with exposure to companies located outside the U.S., there exist two basic choices: A global mutual fund or an international mutual fund.2,3

By definition, international funds invest in non-U.S. markets, while global funds may invest in U.S. stocks alongside non-U.S. stocks.

Make a Choice

The definition may seem clear, but what may seem less clear is why an investor might select one over the other.

The reason that an investor may select a global fund is to provide the portfolio manager with the latitude to move the fund’s investments among non-U.S. markets and the U.S. market in order to take advantage of the shifts in relative opportunities these markets may present at any given moment.

By investing in a global fund, the challenge for the investor is that he or she may not know at any point in time their total exposure to the U.S. market within the context of their overall portfolio.

An Inside Look

As a consequence, some investors want to manage their allocation risk by setting the broad asset allocation for their portfolio and then identifying funds that are within those asset classes. For these investors, an international fund may make more sense since it allows them to maintain a greater adherence to their desired domestic/international stock allocation.

Keep in mind that asset allocation is an approach to help manage investment risk. Asset allocation does not guarantee against investment loss.

As you consider a global or an international fund, you should also be aware of the fund’s approach to the inherent currency risks. Some funds choose to engage in strategies that may mitigate the effects of currency fluctuations, while others consider currency movements – up and down – to be an element of portfolio performance.

Mutual funds are sold only by prospectus. Please consider the charges, risks, expenses and investment objectives carefully before investing. A prospectus containing this and other information about the investment company can be obtained from your financial professional. Read it carefully before you invest or send money.

 

This material was prepared by Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of  The Retirement Group or FSC Financial Corp. This information should not be construed as investment advice. Neither the named Representatives nor Broker/Dealer gives tax or legal advice. All information is believed to be from reliable sources; however, we make no representation as to its completeness or accuracy. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If other expert assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. Please consult your Financial Advisor for further information or call 800-900-5867.

 

The Retirement Group is not affiliated with nor endorsed by fidelity.com, netbenefits.fidelity.com, hewitt.com, resources.hewitt.com, access.att.com, ING Retirement, AT&T, Qwest, Chevron, Hughes, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, ExxonMobil, Glaxosmithkline, Merck, Pfizer, Verizon, Bank of America, Alcatel-Lucent or by your employer. We are an independent financial advisory group that specializes in transition planning and lump sum distribution. Please call our office at 800-900-5867 if you have additional questions or need help in the retirement planning process.

 

The Retirement Group is a Registered Investment Advisor not affiliated with FSC Securities and may be reached at www.theretirementgroup.com.


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Tags: Financial Planning, Lump Sum, Pension, Retirement Planning